9/27/19

CRU Goes Down the Woke Hole

Jon reviews the sessions from CRU's (formerly "Campus Crusade for Christ) 2019 staff conference and reveals how it could have been worse! Also, Jon discusses some of his thoughts and experience with college ministry in general.

Video:


Audio:


Patreon:
https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation

Subscribe:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Like Us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/

Follow Us on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast

Follow Us on Gab:
https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation

Follow Jon on Twitter
https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos

Subscribe on Minds
https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation

More Ways to Listen:
https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation

Mentioned in this podcast:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRgjEPFf904

9/21/19

TGC on Economic Disparities, Social Justice 1977, and Understanding CRT

Jon briefly summarizes evangelical social justice news from the past week, compares a TGC article called, "A Book on Dignity for All Has Much to Teach the Church," with Ron Sider's "Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger," and explains the purpose, nature, and strategy of Critical Race Theory.

Video:



Audio:



Patreon:
https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation

Subscribe:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Like Us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/

Follow Us on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast

Follow Us on Gab:
https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation

Follow Jon on Twitter
https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos

Subscribe on Minds
https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation

More Ways to Listen:
https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation

9/18/19

Think Local Act Local with Eric Rowell

Eric Rowell discusses how he got involved in local politics, and how thinking local and acting local has helped him as an individual have a greater impact.

Video:



Audio:



Patreon:
https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation

Subscribe:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Like Us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/

Follow Us on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast

Follow Us on Gab:
https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation

Follow Jon on Twitter
https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos

Subscribe on Minds
https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation

More Ways to Listen:
https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation

Mentioned in this Podcast:

https://www.ericwrowell.com/

twitter: @ericwrowell

Think local, Act local list - Notes for Conversations That Matter podcast

- Eric wrote back in Sept. 2016, - "The most depressing aspect of the presidential election isn’t
the candidates we have to choose from, but how many individuals seem to believe the next president will have a greater impact
on their lives than the impact each individual can have on his or her own life. Start learning more about your local
government prior to municipal elections next year if you want to make a difference in an election with real impact on your life."

- First Think Local efforts - Cheraw
- Spoke out against town's plan to buy local golf course (course has since been purchased by private developer, transformed into
great course and club)
- Questioned premise of multiple issues coming from town hall - taxpayer subsidized gym memberships, land swaps with friends of politicians

- Charlotte
- Worked to bring attention to problematic pedicab regulations, helped to protect ability for small companies to compete
- Even in a city the size of Charlotte, one person can still bring needed attention to various issues

- Huntersville
- Small items that otherwise would have gone unnoticed / big picture - town knows someone is watching now
- I regularly share town board agenda and town board meetings / sent out candidate questionnaires in 2017 and again for
2019 local election
- I helped push for greater transparency from town board - live streaming of meetings
- Worked to bring needed management change to local athletic facility, finally brought about a competitive bid process
- Helped expose corrupt former town board member
- Helped to slow growth of forced charity/charitable spending by town politicians
- Open govt successes - town board stating why going into closed session, HPD incident reports, crime stat reporting
- Brought attention to local police officer using town resources for personal benefit, resulted in his resignation
- Helped stop town's public art commission from getting public monies - for now
     - And helped stop town from partnering with social justice activist on public art commission
- Started a fb group focusing on local politics only, grown to 475 members
- Helped get a local politician to drop frivolous suit filed against a citizen
- Questioned local Fire Dept. enough that they sent no-contact letter to me from their attorney - bc I was seeking more transparency
- Brought to light property owned by the town being rented far under market value to boyfriend of town staff member

- Served on three board appointed advisory boards - great way to get involved with local government and ensure a common sense
viewpoint is provided for future planning

- Town employees are often also town residents so they don't want to see tax dollars wasted either, but they often can't speak
out because of fear of retaliation, I've done my best to give those town employees a voice at my website

Is the Reformed Christian Movement Splitting over "Woke" Theology?

Predictions of a split in the Southern Baptist Convention have intensified since the infamous "Resolution 9," which endorsed Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality as useful "analytical tools," was passed during the Convention meeting in June. However, the first signs of a split within evangelical Christianity are not coming from the Southern Baptist Convention, at least directly.

It did not escape notice when John MacArthur was not included in the speaker line up for Together for the Gospel's 2020 T4G conference. Conversely, T4G speakers and Shepherd's Conference regulars, Mark Dever, Al Mohler, and Ligon Duncan, were not included in the initial 2020 Shepherd's Conference line up at MacArthur's Grace Community Church.

This past Tuesday, while speaking to The Master's Seminary student body, John MacArthur stated:

"There seems to be less and less willingness to fight these days among many evangelical leaders. They seem to be capitulating to whatever the whims of the culture happen to be. And that is because we now are into about the 4th decade of pragmatism and it has sucked all the masculinity out of so many people who are unwilling to take a strong stand when it may be unpopular."

He continued:

"Caught up in the feminist agenda are evangelicals who don't want to offend people because they're pragmatic and they've sold their souls to pragmatism in ministry so they become part of the MeToo or YouToo, or this race or that race, or this identity or that identity. They lose the fierceness that is required in defending the faith."

Reflecting on his own personal battle for truth and biblical authority MacArthur said:

"I don't think I really understood in seminary how relentless this battle would be, and how much discernment it would take, and how it would affect relationships. How many relationships eventually look like they're going the right direction but are eventually sacrificed to an unwillingness to do battle. And you wind up sort of at the end of your life being stripped of people who at some point gave in to the other side and the ranks get thinner and thinner. I'm sort of living in that era." "I watch my life as it comes to an end being stripped of relationships with many many evangelical leaders because at some point they're unwilling to stand where I stand."

After recounting his own involvement in the charismatic and lordship salvation controversies, the aged radio preacher and seminary chancellor emeritus declared:

"Now the enemy is inside the church in ways that I've never seen it."

He explained:

“Always you’re surprised by who all of a sudden defects. And what causes that? Well briefly, ‘Certain persons have crept in unnoticed.’ Persons of influence, teachers in seminaries, writers, theologians, but false teachers. That is they’re inside the Christian wall. They’re part of the church. They’re supposedly representatives of God and the Lord Jesus Christ.”

If a split is occurring over "woke" doctrine, it appears the Reformed Christian movement is the first place it's happening.

9/14/19

Academic Group Think, Social Justice in the 70s, What God Says About Wealth, and Fan Questions

Jon explains why liberals seem more united than conservatives, then gives a brief history of the evangelical social justice movement, takes some time to explain why wealth can be a blessing, and answers some fan questions.



Audio:



Patreon:
https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation

Subscribe:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

Like Us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/

Follow Us on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast

Follow Us on Gab:
https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation

Follow Jon on Twitter
https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos

Subscribe on Minds
https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation

More Ways to Listen:
https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation

Mentioned in this Podcast:

https://standagainstmarxism.com/

9/10/19

Stand Against Marxism with Judd Saul

Methodists, Wesleyans, and Lutherans are being influenced by the social justice movement

Since the infamous "Resolution 9," which endorsed Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality as "analytical tools" in the Southern Baptist Convention, there has been a lot of talk about America's largest Protestant denomination. However, it's worth noting that the social justice movement is having a universal impact on many evangelical groups, including Methodist, Wesleyan, and Lutheran denominations.

Asbury University, a traditional Wesleyan institution, now offers small group leaders the opportunity to study "social justice," and if they'd like, to earn a DMin in "Social Justice, Ethics and the Church," through the seminary, which covers topics such as "poverty, health care, crime, prison overpopulation, corporate responsibility, addiction, race relations, marriage, policies governing sexuality and gender, unwanted pregnancies, [and] refugees." This development follows on the heals of a 2013 grant from the Kern Family Foundation which established an “Office of Work and Economics in the Wesleyan Tradition" at the seminary.

Indiana Wesleyan University strives to be a "multicultural institution" and a 
"diverse learning community reflecting the world in which we live" while serving the Wesleyan church's "twenty-first century emphasis . . . on exalting Christ through worldwide missions, compassion ministries, and concern for social justice that reaches out to all people." Through the office of "Intercultural Learning and Engagement" the school "offers scholarship opportunities for students of diverse intersectionalities who exhibit community leadership and willingness to engage in questions of cultural identity, equity, and justice."

In July, Shenandoah University, affiliated with the United Methodist Church, hired "Hanaa Unus," a Muslim, "to serve as chaplain and Muslim community coordinator." The same month, Southern Wesleyan University sent seven religion students to Chicago and Milwaukee for ministry training where, instead of learning and applying gospel evangelism, they "had sessions . . . on incarnational theology, [and] systemic problems in urban areas." Students learned that “being hospitable means you are leveling the playing field between yourself and others . . . equalizing the power dynamic." 

In August, "The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America passed a measure declaring their entire denomination a 'sanctuary church' for migrants, including those who entered the United States illegally." Chris Boerger, the ELCA's secretary stated, “As a white church we say the right words. We, the majority population of this church, need to do more than talk.”

These websites and news stories only highlight the tip of the iceberg.

9/3/19

Deflect and Deny: Al Mohler and Thabiti Anyawbile Respond to Exposure of SBC Professors

The Enemies Within the Church project, as well as other efforts to expose and refute the social justice movement within American Christendom, are having an effect. Last Friday evening, Enemies Within the Church revealed a compilation highlighting various quotations from three Southern Seminary Professors endorsing aspects of Critical Race Theory between 2014 and 2018. Included were statements by Provost Matthew Hall, as well as Curtis Woods and Jarvis Williams.

The video opens with a statement by president of Southern Seminary, Albert Mohler, in which he claimed in August that "No one is going to be teaching at Southern Seminary from the 'other side'" "of postmodern, critical theory." The compilation proceeds to show Matthew Hall in a 2016 interview, where he appears along with Dr. Otis Moss III, who took over for Jeremiah Wright, Barack Obama's famous pastor, at Trinity Church of Christ in Chicago. Hall shares that he was not exposed to "categories of race, justice, and reconciliation" until attending a "secular university." It was this experience which "blew up his whole world," when he realized he had a "racialized lens." Hall later explains, that even after this revelation, both on a 2016 panel and a 2018 interview, he still considers himself to be a "racist," due to being "immersed in a culture where" he benefits "from racism all the time."

For Hall, the term race is not referring to "biology," but rather, "ideology," specifically, "power" and "status." Hall defines "racism," as "a whole system built on allocating privileges, power, opportunities, in inequitable ways on the basis of race." In Hall's world, "Billy Graham and everything surrounding his ministry," "a lot of it is tied to whiteness." He even laments the "all white elder board" at his own church, stating "We want to be diverse but we want to have diversity on our terms." Hall sarcastically follows up this statement with, "We want to [be] multicultural, but not really, because we're Reformed or Gospel centered . . ." Even Southern Seminary itself, Hall states, in a tone which denotes a problem, is "remarkably white."

The solution, according to Hall in a 2017 panel, is to first come to terms with the truth. A process he sees as his mission as a historian and theologian. "Everything you thought was true about your tradition, your denomination, your own family . . . I'm going to pull the veil back. And what looked like this narrative of faithfulness and orthodoxy and truth and righteousness and justice. I'm going to peel that back and show you the rotting corpse of white supremacy that's underneath that surface."

The second step, in Hall's words, is to pursue "racial justice," a phrase that makes "white folks" "very nervous," especially since in the last few years there has been a "normalization" of "almost explicitly racist [language] in the church." Racial justice includes pursuing a "global curriculum" influenced by non-White authors. One example given is W. E. B. Du Bois, who Hall admits "would cringe if he were identified as an evangelical," but justifies by claiming, "there are so many things that haunt Du Bois in his writing that are deeply Christian." In addition to broadening theological curriculum, Hall asks church leaders how they can "actively seek to share power with" minority "brothers and sisters in Christ."

On September 2, Al Mohler, in what appeared to be a defensive maneuver, tweeted a week-old-picture of Hall signing the "Abstract of Principles." Immediately flooding and dominating the comment section were links to both the compilation video and last week's article from Enemies Within the Church, "Why Faith Statements Won't Save Us." The next day, in a Gospel Coalition blog post, Thabiti Anyabwile asked, "Is there an evangelical social justice movement?" In the article, Anyabwile attempts to defend Jarvis William's recommendation of Richard Delgado's "Critical Race Theory," on the basis of William's status as a scholar. The author then tries to expand the scope of Christian discipleship to include social justice under the umbrella of Christian ethics.
What looks like a weak deflection from Mohler, and out-of-touch mental gymnastics from Anyabwile, seem to indicate one thing: Our efforts are working. Ignoring the whistle blowers is no longer a viable option for evangelical leaders. The 13-minute compilation of statements from Hall, Jarvis, and Woods has received approximately 5,000 views so far through various platforms. What will a state-of-the-art feature length movie accomplish when it's released?
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...