6/25/20

How Woke Evangelism Corrupts the Gospel with Seth Richardson

Evangelist Seth Richardson talks about his own experience coming out of a cult and joining a Southern Baptist Church, only to find cultish tendencies in the evangelism ministry. Seth recounts how he came to understand the errors of using things like D.A. Horton's "thebonics" and principles in Eric Mason's "Woke Church." Finally, Seth contrasts the true gospel with the social justice message.

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6/24/20

Take Down Mississippi's State Flag . . . Or Grandchildren May Go LGBTQUIA

For years Ligon Duncan has been very influential in evangelical circle through his leadership positions at Reformed Theological Seminary, The Gospel Coalition, and The Presbyterian Church of America. He has spoken at major conservative evangelical conferences such as The Shepherd’s Conference and Ligonier. However, in the last few years, Duncan has taken what appears to be a left turn.

In 2018, At the T4G conference, Duncan publicly pitched an emotional indictment against “Baptists and Presbyterians” of the “19th century leading up to 1837.” Their sin? They allegedly “decided that slavery and slaveholding was dividing the church” so they told themselves that “‘If you talk about stuff like that in the church you're getting into politics and social life.’ . . . and all the while they were saying [that loving your neighbor] doesn't apply here.” Though it well documented that prominent Southern Presbyterians were actually concerned about a corruption of biblical teaching on the topic of slave/master relationships, not making love of neighbor a "political issue," Duncan wept as he blamed the influence of his Presbyterian forebears for blinding him to racism and keeping him from caring about it.

The next year, Duncan asked, “How are we going to deal with a culture which is increasingly antagonistic to Bible Believing Christianity?” He stated that he had “started to see generational differences in how to deal with [social justice]” and was concerned that “racial issues” could potentially “drive my grandchildren into the arms of the LGBTQUIA issue.” AD Robles, a conservative Christian commentator observed that Duncan was trying to "get a little bit woke, so [his grandchildren] don't go all the way woke."

Later that year, Duncan wrote a forward for Eric Mason's book "Woke Church," calling Mason "A faithful gospel preacher who loves and believes the inspired, inerrant, infallible, authoritative Word of God, who is a transcendent voice in this larger discussion.” Mason's book endorses Black Lives Matter, follows the general interpretation of American history laid down by the 1619 project, harps on what he considers systemic injustice by police, yet ignores the negative impact of the welfare state on the Black family.

Some politically conservative supporters of Ligon Duncan have been surprised by his eagerness to endorse social justice. A few have suggested that perhaps Reformed Theological Seminary and Duncan may have been compromised by accepting financial support from James Riady, an Indonesian billionaire affiliated with Bill Clinton and banned from the States for his involvement in the Clinton fundraising scandal. However, it’s entirely possible that like much of leadership in the evangelical world, Duncan has either changed his mind or gone along with the social justice agenda out of conviction or for pragmatic ends.

Duncan, a seasoned preacher, is very good at pulling heart strings and emotionally connecting. His latest deployment of these skills on behalf of the social justice movement came earlier this week when he called for Mississippi to change their state flag by removing its Confederate imagery.

Duncan starts off by touting his Southern credentials before ripping into the Confederacy for symbolizing the perpetuation of chattel slavery and denial of black people’s “social and political equality.” What follows are a series of associations meant to tarnish the state flag. Mississippi’s secession declaration (Duncan incorrectly refers to the "Ordinance of Secession" for some reason), which predates both the war and the Confederate Battle Flag, somehow proves the war was over slavery. Yet, Duncan fails to make the proper distinctions a historian should be careful to make.

Mississippi, like South Carolina, Georgia, and Texas, mainly focused on the sectional conflict over the “expansion” of slavery. As Mississippi native Jefferson Davis wrote, “It was a question of distribution, or dispersion, of the slaves, rather than the ‘extension of slavery’” itself. Prominent Presbyterian James Henley Thornwell summed up the major debate over slavery this way: “To exclude slaveholding is . . . to exclude the south.” In other words, the lower South did not secede to promote slavery as a morally virtuous and perpetual institution. The Confederate Constitution itself forbade the importation of slaves. Rather, they believed the North had violated the Constitution and undermined popular sovereignty by purposely keeping influential Southerners from moving to Western states with their slaves. This did not change the number of slaves, but rather where they lived. The early Republican party was determined to keep slavery in the South, which is part of the reason they never proposed plans for integration into the North or the West.

At the time of the war, the Revised Code of Indiana stated, “any white person encouraging Negroes to enter the state was subjected to a $500 dollar fine.” Two years before the war Abraham Lincoln said, “the next best thing” to ridding the country of black people was “to keep them apart where they are not already together. If white and black people never get together in Kansas, they will never mix blood in Kansas…” The same year, Illinois Republican Lyman Trumbull said, “I want to have nothing to do with the free negro or the slave negro….We wish to settle the Territories with free white men.” The slogan for Republican Edward Bates 1860 campaign was, “Missouri for white men and white men for Missouri.”

Northern Republicans, whose region had been foremost in profiting from the slave trade, wanted to keep over half the free blacks who resided in the South, as well as the slave populations, from moving North or West. Simultaneously, however, they exerted pressure on Southerners to immediately free slaves without compensation, an attitude which Mississippi stated left them with “no room to hope for cessation or for pause.” This desire to keep black people contained in the South extended beyond the war and helped result in hundreds of thousands of former slaves starving in an impoverished war-torn region. Mississippians could see that Northern rhetoric seemingly intended to “elevate or to support the slave,” actually destroyed “his present condition without providing a better.” The North, they stated, advocated the social and political equality of blacks and promoted slave insurrections "in our midst," yet NOT in Northern States, where they refused to provide such equality.

Of course, the political and cultural debate between North and South had raged for decades before the war over deeper issues. Thornwell described the conflict between the regions as a battle between “Christianity and Atheism” as early as 1851. While Northerners were adopting higher critical readings of scripture, he successfully battled these views throughout the 1830s-50s at South Carolina College. The issue of higher criticism alone caused Southern schools to implement an extremely popular Christian apologetics program which incorporated “Evidences of Christianity.” The Confederate Congress endorsed Henry Timrod’s characterization that the North had a “religion” but not a “Christian faith.”

Meanwhile, in Congress, Senators Calhoun, Webster, and Clay all battled over primarily economic sectional issues like the War of 1812, the National Bank, tariffs, and eventually the expansion of slavery, while still attempting to maintain the Union. The Northeast threatened to secede over the inclusion of Texas. South Carolina threatened to secede over the Force Bill, which they nullified. Tension between agrarian and commercial interests contributed to the vilification of the South by the Northern presses, pulpits, and schools until Mississippians truly believed the “whole popular mind of the North [was] excited and inflamed with prejudice.”

Of course, there never would have been a war, Confederate Battle Flag, or 1894 Mississippi State Flag had Federal troops not invaded the State, which ultimately was the cause of the war, and an important motivation for the secession of many upper South states as well. The current question regarding the Mississippi state flag actually has little to do with their secession declaration, and much more to do with the sacrifice of men who defended their State and homes from Sherman’s Army. In fact, Governor Stone's daughter described his motivation in incorporating the 1894 design as due to his love for the "memory of valor and courage of those brave men who wore the grey . . ." He mentioned nothing about slavery, oppression, terror, the inferiority of black people, lynching, or voting rights—all of which Ligon Duncan attaches to the flag while ignoring authorial intent.

Duncan seeks to use the current news cycle, focused on “systemic racism,” to turn Mississippians away from Governor Stone’s intent, and the original purpose of the design, to instead solely focus on racial problems from the State’s past. If Mississippians want to take down their flag, that is their prerogative and perhaps there are reasons they might want to do so. But they ought to be honest about why the design was adopted in the first place. They also should not allow their legislature to jam through a measure during the current irrational and emotional news cycle. As Ligon Duncan expressed last year, he's worried his own grandchildren could be driven "into the arms of the LGBTQUIA" lobby. Yet, this is exactly how to accomplish that very thing. The mob does not slow down. And, appeasing them with flags is more than a little like the children's book Duncan perhaps read to his grandchildren, "If you give a moose a muffin."

Perhaps, if for no other reason, the flag should stay in place currently as a barrier to a mob whose intent is to rip down just about everything from America's past based upon similar cherry-picked readings. None of us approve of the American slave system, ethnic partiality, or any measures used to oppress undeserving people. But, another form of "civil" slavery called "socialism" is upon us and we don't want to help that revolution commence further by giving in to the demands of that system.

Duncan has opened himself up to his own cancellation when someone just as emotional comes along and perverts "loving neighbor" to mean taking down the symbols of oppression against "LGBTQUIA" people. There used to be a phrase Americans were fond of at one time: "We do not negotiate with terrorists." Perhaps it's time to adjudicate political disputes without doing so in the pressure cooker of immediately catering to the whims of a competing social justice religion whose ultimate goal is to end Christianity . . . for the sake of our grandchildren.

6/23/20

Time to Cancel Lottie Moon

It is no secret that Southern Baptist leaders carry a large burden of white guilt for historic situations and symbols they consider insensitive to Americans blessed with African lineage. They are especially ashamed of their own denomination's history. And, interestingly, they think they somehow have the power to change the legacy of their self-assessed complicity through lamentation and other measures (a very "white" assumption from the perspective of Critical Race Theory advocates, if there ever was one).

In 1989, the Convention issued a statement against racism and bigotry. They apologized for slavery in 1995. In 1996, they made a statement condemning arson in African American churches. In 2007 they denounced the Dred Scott Decision. In 2015 there was another statement on racial reconciliation. The next year, they issued a statement against the Confederate Battle Flag. In 2017, the Convention adopted a resolution against “Alt-Right White Supremacy.”

In 2018, Danny Akin, the president of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary sponsored a resolution which, among other things, condemned the first president of the convention, William B. Johnson for promoting slavery in his inaugural address. Johnson's crime concerned his disagreement with the Mission Board in Boston, which "had placed itself in direct opposition to the Constitution of the Convention" by disqualifying slave-holders from becoming missionaries and had "failed to prove—That slavery is, in all circumstances, sinful." This resolution failed amidst the crowded slate of resolutions also condemning some form of, you guessed it, racism.

The Convention adopted a resolution against using the "Curse of Ham” as a justification for slavery, and another statement condemning racism. Add to this the various statements written, sponsored, or supported by Southern Baptist entities and one begins to swim in a sea of anti-racist statements all attempting to once-and-for-all rid the Convention of, as Al Mohler likes to call it, “the stain of racism.”

The latest attempt to use racial animosity as a pretext for societal revolution has afforded Southern Baptists yet another opportunity to condemn one of their most cherished subjects—racism. Prominent SBC pastors like Thabiti Anywabwile and David Platt encouraged marching with Black Lives Matter. The president of the Convention, J.D. Greear, called for the retirement of the “Broadus gavel”—deemed unholy for having been the unfortunate block of wood to have been in contact early on with a slave-holder and Confederate supporter. The Mississippi Baptist Convention took it upon themselves this week to condemn the Mississippi State Flag for its symbolic Confederate imagery.

As advocates of cheap bravery rush to show solidarity with the forces of revolution and obtain their unearned “pat on the head” from media elites, one wonders where this will all end? Perhaps, Southern Baptist comrades should showcase their fidelity to the revolution by demonstrating some, you know, REAL sacrifice. It will be easy for the scoffers and "exvangelicals" to see through token measures meant to placate other comrades. However, what if the SBC were to make a financial sacrifice for their oppressed minority brothers and sisters made in the image of God? What if Southern Baptists eliminated the Lottie Moon offering for the racism it is!

Think about it.

Lottie Moon was born into a "fifteen-hundred-acre tobacco plantation." Her father "was the largest slaveholder (fifty-two slaves) in Albemarle County" Virginia. Lottie never, that we know of, apologized for her privilege or her family's complicity in holding slaves.

In 1875, Lottie Moon said "Where the Caucasian goes, he carries energy and an inferior race is aroused by the contact." In 1876, Moon claimed that “self-respect” compelled her to reject any potential “decision of any Chinaman or body of Chinamen” to determine the place of her ministry. She likened such an affront to an “African church in Richmond” telling Dr. Warren where he could live. (Send the Light, 162) Moon was most likely referring to Dr. Edward Warren, who had been the medical inspector of the Army of Northern Virginia. Lottie Moon’s sister, Oriana Russell Moon Andrews, had served the Confederate Army as a nurse under Warren.

Also in 1876, Moon talked about another missionary, Mrs. Holmes, who didn't want to move and abandon her "duty to these poor heathen," but knew her son, Landrum needed to go to the United States. The boy would likely live with Methodist relatives "Northern in political sentiment," an arrangement whose influence Holmes was “not willing to subject her boy to.” Moon sought alternative arrangements for the boy to help him avoid what to her was an understandable negative situation. (Send the Light, 35)

In addition, Moon said Chinese funeral processions contained "barbaric pomp and show" in 1884. Two years later she proclaimed, concerning China, "The life here as we Western people consider life, is exceedingly narrow & contracted. Constant contact with people of a low civilization & many disgusting habits is a trial to one of refined feelings & tastes." In 1907, Moon opined that a large “Reunion of Confederate veterans” must have been “pleasant.” (Send the Light, 425)

This cursory sketch of some of Lottie Moon's views make it clear that if Southern Baptists want to truly show their loyalty to the spirit of the age, they will disband the Lottie Moon Christmas offering. As an added bonus, perhaps they should return 1.5 Billion dollars in funds collected in support for their colonization work they refer to as "missions." Western male Christians, exploiting the legacy of a "racist" white female, have tried to dominate the minds of brown-skinned members of minority religions for far too long.

Mr. Greear, tear down your idol. Cancel Lottie Moon.

6/22/20

A Lament: How TGC is Destroying Justice and the Church

The Gospel Coalition hosted a "A Night of Lament for Racial Justice" in which they attempted to "Christianize" a secular Leftist revolutionary perspective. This video exposes their game-plan for mixing social justice theory with the gospel and exposes their anti-biblical assumptions and arguments.

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Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation Subscribe: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Like Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/ Follow Us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast Follow Jon on Parler: https://parler.com/profile/JonHarris/posts Follow Jon on Twitter https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos Follow Us on Gab: https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation Subscribe on Minds https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation More Ways to Listen: https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation Homicides 2005-2015 International Business Times https://www.ibtimes.com/white-black-crime-vs-black-white-crime-new-statistics-show-more-killings-between-2424598 Black on White 5294 White on Black 2331 Interracial Violent Crime Incidents 2018 (Bureau of Justice) https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf Black on White 547948 White on Black 59778 Mentioned in this Podcast (Statistics) Unarmed Police Shootings 2015-2020 (Washington Post) https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/investigations/police-shootings-database/ Black 1298 White 2476 Violent Incidents Against Black People 2018 (Bureau of Justice) https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf 37.4 of Violent Crime Arrests 33 of Inmates (2017) https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/04/30/shrinking-gap-between-number-of-blacks-and-whites-in-prison/ 13.4 of population National Acadamy of Sciences: “We find no evidence of anti-Black or anti-Hispanic disparities across shootings, and White officers are not more likely to shoot minority civilians than non-White officers.” https://www.pnas.org/content/116/32/15877 36% of Abortions are of Black Babies https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/ss/ss6713a1.htm 1973–2016 General Social Survey: “Analyses revealed that Black Americans in general were more likely to view pornography than Whites, and they were increasing in their pornography viewership at a higher rate than Whites. Moreover, Black men were more likely to consume pornography than all other race/gender combinations . . .” https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00224499.2017.1404959 Black/White Disparities: Canada vs. United States https://slowtowrite.com/our-fathers-our-failures/

6/18/20

Top 10 #BlackLivesMatter Memes

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Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation Subscribe: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Like Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/ Follow Us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast Follow Jon on Parler: https://parler.com/profile/JonHarris/posts Follow Jon on Twitter https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos Follow Us on Gab: https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation Subscribe on Minds https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation More Ways to Listen: https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation Mentioned in this Podcast: Interracial Violent Crime Incidents 2018 (Bureau of Justice) https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf Unarmed Police Shootings 2015-2020 (Washington Post) https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/investigations/police-shootings-database/ Violent Incidents Against Black People 2018 (Bureau of Justice) https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf Prison Inmate Stats 2017 (Pew Research) https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/04/30/shrinking-gap-between-number-of-blacks-and-whites-in-prison/ Abortion Stats by Ethnicity https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/ss/ss6713a1.htm

6/15/20

The Confusion of Law and Gospel, From Young Calvinists to Social Justice

Mike Abendroth from No Compromise Radio talks about how the gospel is corrupted when mixed with law.

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6/9/20

Black Lives Matter and the New Religion

Defunding the police? Ripping down history? Silence is violence? Turning a blind eye to murder, stealing, and vandalism? What makes sense of all this? This isn't merely a political movement. It's a new religion, complete with saints, holy books, rituals, priests, laws, and a salvation plan. Jon takes a look under the hood of the social justice movement to explain its fundamental problems and dangerous solutions.


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6/2/20

Why are All My Friends Marxists?

While friends and family are lamenting their "white privilege" and vowing to own their complicity in "systemic oppression," Jon explains how a Marxist revolution is actually taking place, and it's not just a political movement---it's a new religion. Video:


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The New Religion PDF






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MEGA EDITION: Fuller Reaction, Southern Denominations, The Civil War, CRT, Rom 13, Demonstrations

First, Jon analyzes SBTS's response to Russell Fuller's critiques (5:09).Then, Jon talks about the denominational divisions which led up to the Civil War (36:30) and Civil War historiography (01:39:00). Finally, a little on Critical Race Theory, hypocrisy in evangelical circles (01:52:00), and Rom 13.


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Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/worldviewconversation Subscribe: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/conversations-that-matter/id1446645865?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Like Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldviewconversation/ Follow Us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/conversationsthatmatterpodcast Follow Us on Gab: https://gab.ai/worldiewconversation Follow Jon on Twitter https://twitter.com/worldviewconvos Subscribe on Minds https://www.minds.com/worldviewconversation More Ways to Listen: https://anchor.fm/worldviewconversation Mentioned in this Podcast: https://www.amazon.com/Sacred-Conviction-Souths-Biblical-Authority/dp/1947660101 http://www.worldviewconversation.com/2018/01/how-to-engage-social-justice-warriors.html
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